Mike Pierce's blog

There’s No Place Like Home: Creating a Desirable Business Culture

Two unrelated news stories this week have me thinking about what they have in common.

These stories both have to do with Cleveland and show how this town is on the upswing. The Republican National Convention will be held here in 2016, and LeBron James is coming back to Cleveland. In both cases, there is an underlying statement that this area is growing and has a lot to offer. It is, simply said, a desirable place.

How Upfront Project Planning and a Design-Build Approach Benefits the Customer

The most recent issue of Engineering News Record (ENR) featured two articles that referenced improvements being introduced into the planning of projects. The first article noted changes in the AIA family of contracts, which include terms and conditions that are “designed to protect the Owner’s criteria for a project; [and] enhance the design in design-build, including a requirement for preliminary design by the design builder…”

It's All About the Fundamentals

 

Recently, an experienced sales professional told me he was focusing on making connections and he wasn’t going to go out on any “milk runs” until he had a live prospect. Email and networking on the phone was his strategy for connecting and prequalifying leads.

Reading for Continuous Improvement and Business Growth

For a long time, I have made it a habit to always read one or two books at the same time. My personal formula is a non-fiction book on history, especially biographies, and a business book of some sort. For many reasons, I fell out of this practice the first six months of this year. I had been reading a book on organizational lifecycles that, while very interesting, read like a text book.

Project Communications: Writing with Empathy

Several recent communication issues with some clients have surfaced that have caused me to think about the common link between them. What I have found is that written communications take place with more focus on communicating what the writer wants to say, rather than being empathetic to how the intended reader will interpret the message.

Project Team Communication: How to Optimize Project Success

In mulling over a number of issues that are occupying the time and focus of company managers recently, the common thread weaving its way through each of them is communication – lack of, poor or misguided communication. I find it interesting that the thing we each do every day, communicate, can be at the core of what causes us problems most often.

Learning from Heroes: Memorial Day Reflections

Memorial Day Morning, 2014

Memorial Day is a day, a weekend, in which we typically kickoff summer. Parades, picnics and festivals are all celebrations of the coming months. Yet through it all, we should not forget the solemnity for which the holiday was created. The sacrifices others have made on our behalf to retain our freedoms and our way of life. It is why the United States remains the most desired place on Earth to live.

Purposeful Leadership: Reputation and Principles

Over the past week, I have come across articles about firms in our industry who are paying substantial fines for fraudulent practices. Unrelated to that, some colleagues from Atlanta were discussing the issues in the Atlanta school system, where a few years ago, teachers had test correction parties to alter answers on tests before they were run through the scanners, so that they could point to improved test scores.

5 Lessons for Managing People, Projects and Organizations

While I’ve written about some of these issues before, below is a compilation of some Lessons Learned that are important to remember in managing people, organizations, projects and tasks. These are a few things that I have learned over time. Hopefully, they will serve as a reminder to me, and will be helpful to others as a guide to their efforts to move people and companies forward.

 

How to Manage Organizational Disputes and Embrace All Perspectives

Every organization endures some friction amongst its staff. Even the most experienced and cohesive management team will encounter disagreement and dispute. It reflects human nature, and it is healthy for the organization to have some conflict.

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